Dochula Pass, Bhutan

Picture of the page in action.

UniView now supports Unicode version 9, which is being released today, including all changes made during the beta period. (As before, images are not available for the Tangut additions, but the character information is available.)

This version of UniView also introduces a new filter feature. Below each block or range of characters is a set of links that allows you to quickly highlight characters with the property letter, mark, number, punctuation, or symbol. For more fine-grained property distinctions, see the Filter panel.

In addition, for some blocks there are other links available that reflect tags assigned to characters. This tagging is far from exhaustive! For instance, clicking on sanskrit will not show all characters used in Sanskrit.

The tags are just intended to be an aid to help you find certain characters quickly by exposing words that appear in the character descriptions or block subsection titles. For example, if you want to find the Bengali currency symbol while viewing the Bengali block, click on currency and all other characters but those related to currency will be dimmed.

(Since the highlight function is used for this, don’t forget that, if you happen to highlight a useful subset of characters and want to work with just those, you can use the Make list from highlights command, or click on the upwards pointing arrow icon below the text area to move those characters into the text area.)

Picture of the page in action.

UniView now supports the characters introduced for the beta version of Unicode 9. Any changes made during the beta period will be added when Unicode 9 is officially released. (Images are not available for the Tangut additions, but the character information is available.)

It also brings in notes for individual characters where those notes exist, if Show notes is selected. These notes are not authoritative, but are provided in case they prove useful.

A new icon was added below the text area to add commas between each character in the text area.

Links to the help page that used to appear on mousing over a control have been removed. Instead there is a noticeable, blue link to the help page, and the help page has been reorganised and uses image maps so that it is easier to find information. The reorganisation puts more emphasis on learning by exploration, rather than learning by reading.

Various tweaks were made to the user interface.

Picture of the page in action.
>> Use UniView

This update allows you to link to information about Han characters and Hangul syllables, and fixes some bugs related to the display of Han character blocks.

Information about Han characters displayed in the lower right area will have a link View data in Unihan database. As expected, this opens a new window at the page of the Unihan database corresponding to this character.

Han and hangul characters also have a link View in PDF code charts (pageXX). On Firefox and Chrome, this will open the PDF file for that block at the page that lists this character. (For Safari and Edge you will need to scroll to the page indicated.) The PDF is useful if there is no picture or font glyph for that character, but also allows you to see the variant forms of the character.

For some Han blocks, the number of characters per page in the PDF file varies slightly. In this case you will see the text approx; you may have to look at a page adjacent to the one you are taken to for these characters.

Note that some of the PDF files are quite large. If the file size exceeds 3Mb, a warning is included.

Picture of the page in action.

>> Use UniView

Unicode 8.0.0 is released today. This new version of UniView adds the new characters encoded in Unicode 8.0.0 (including 6 new scripts). The scripts listed in the block selection menu were also reordered to match changes to the Unicode charts page.

The URL for UniView is now https://r12a.github.io/uniview/. Please change your bookmarks.

The github site now holds images for all 28,000+ Unicode codepoints other than Han ideographs and Hangul syllables (in two sizes).

I also fixed the Show Age filter, and brought it up to date.

Picture of the page in action.

>> Use UniView

This version updates the app per the changes during beta phase of the specification, so that it now reflects the finalised Unicode 7.0.0.

The initial in-app help information displayed for new users was significantly updated, and the help tab now links directly to the help page.

A more significant improvement was the addition of links to character descriptions (on the right) where such details exist. This finally reintegrates the information that was previously pulled in from a database. Links are only provided where additional data actually exists. To see an example, go here and click on See character notes at the bottom right.

Rather than pull the data into the page, the link opens a new window containing the appropriate information. This has advantages for comparing data, but it was also the best solution I could find without using PHP (which is no longer available on the server I use). It also makes it easier to edit the character notes, so the amount of such detail should grow faster. In fact, some additional pages of notes were added along with this upgrade.

A pop-up window containing resource information used to appear when you used the query to show a block. This no longer happens.

Changes in version 7beta

I forgot to announce this version on my blog, so for good measure, here are the (pretty big) changes it introduced.

This version adds the 2,834 new characters encoded in the Unicode 7.0.0 beta, including characters for 23 new scripts. It also simplified the user interface, and eliminated most of the bugs introduced in the quick port to JavaScript that was the previous version.

Some features that were available in version 6.1.0a are still not available, but they are minor.

Significant changes to the UI include the removal of the ‘popout’ box, and the merging of the search input box with that of the other features listed under Find.

In addition, the buttons that used to appear when you select a Unicode block have changed. Now the block name appears near the top right of the page with a I icon icon. Clicking on the icon takes you to a page listing resources for that block, rather than listing the resources in the lower right part of UniView’s interface.

UniView no longer uses a database to display additional notes about characters. Instead, the information is being added to HTML files.

Picture of the page in action.

>> Use UniView

The main addition in this version is a couple of buttons that appear when you ask UniView to display a block.

Clicking on Show annotated list generates a list of all characters in the block, with annotations.

Clicking on Show script links displays a list of links to key sources of information about the script of the block, links to relevant articles and apps on the rishida.net site, and related fonts and input methods. This provides a very quick way of finding this information. One particularly useful link (‘Historical documentation’, which links to a Scriptsource.org page) allows you to find the proposals for all additions to Unicode related to the relevant script. These proposals are a mine of useful information about the individual characters in a block, and SIL staff should get a medal for trawling through all the relevant data to provide this.

In addition, there were some changes to the user interface, including the following:

  • The order of information in the lower right panel (detailed character information) was slightly changed, and two alterative representations of the character were added: an HTML escape, and a URI escape.
  • The search box at the top left was constrained to appear closer to the other controls when the window is stretched wide.

Various bugs were also fixed.

Picture of the page in action.

>> Use UniView

The major change in this update is the update of the data to support Unicode version 6.1.0, which should be released today. (See the list of links to new Unicode blocks below.)

There are also a number of feature and bug related changes.

What UniView does: Look up and see characters (using graphics or fonts) and property information, view whole character blocks or custom ranges, select characters to paste into your document, paste in and discover unknown characters, search for characters, do hex/dec/ncr conversions, highlight character types, etc. etc. Supports Unicode 6.1 and written with Web Standards to work on a variety of browsers. No need to install anything.

List of changes:

  • One significant change enables you to display information in a separate window, rather than overwriting the information currently displayed. This can be done by typing/pasting/dragging a set of characters or character code values into the new Popout area and selecting the  icon alongside the Characters or Copy & paste input fields (depending on what you put in the popout window).

  • Two new icons were added to the Copy & paste area:

    Analyse Clicking on this will display the characters in the area in the lower right part of the page with all relevant characters converted to uppercase, lowercase and titlecase. Characters that had no case conversion information are also listed.

    Analyse Clicking on this produces the same kind of output as clicking on the icon just above, but shows the mappings for those characters that have been changed, eg. e→E.

  • Where character information displayed in the lower right panel has a case or decomposition mapping, UniView now displays the characters involved, rather than just giving the hex value(s), eg. Uppercase mapping: 0043 C. You will need a font on your system to see the characters displayed in this way, but whether or not you have a font, this provides a quick and easy way to copy the case-changed character (rather than having to copy the hex value and convert it first).

  • There is also a new line, slightly further down, when UniView is in graphic mode. This line starts with ‘As text:’, and shows the character using whatever default font you have on your system. Of course, if you don’t have a font that includes that character you won’t see it. This has been added to make it easier to copy and paste a character into text.

  • There is also a new line, slightly further down, when UniView is in graphic mode. This line starts with ‘As text:’, and shows the character using whatever default font you have on your system. Of course, if you don’t have a font that includes that character you won’t see it. This has been added to make it easier to copy and paste a character into text.

  • Fixed some small bugs, such as problems with search when U+29DC INCOMPLETE INFINITY is returned.

Enjoy.

Here are direct links to the new blocks added to Unicode 6.1:

One of the more useful features of UniView is its ability to list the characters in a string with names and codepoints. This is particularly useful when you can’t tell what a string of characters contains because you don’t have a font, or because the script is too complex, etc.

'ishida' in Persian in  nastaliq font style

For example, I was recently sent an email where my name was written in Persian as ایشی‌دا. The image shows how it looks in a nastaliq font.

To see the component characters, drop the string into UniView’s Copy & Paste field and click on the downwards pointing arrow icon. Here is the result:

list of characters

Note how you can now see that there’s an invisible control character in the string. Note also that you see a graphic image for each character, which is a big help if the string you are investigating is just a sequence of boxes on your system.

Not only can you discover characters in this way, but you can create lists of characters which can be pasted into another document, and customise the format of those lists.

Pasting the list elsewhere

If you select this list and paste it into a document, you’ll see something like this:

  0627  ARABIC LETTER ALEF
  06CC  ARABIC LETTER FARSI YEH
  0634  ARABIC LETTER SHEEN
  06CC  ARABIC LETTER FARSI YEH
  200C  ZERO WIDTH NON-JOINER
  062F  ARABIC LETTER DAL
  0627  ARABIC LETTER ALEF

You can make the characters appear by deselecting Use graphics on the Look up tab. (Of course, you need an arabic font to see the list as intended.)

ا  ‎0627  ARABIC LETTER ALEF
ی  ‎06CC  ARABIC LETTER FARSI YEH
ش  ‎0634  ARABIC LETTER SHEEN
ی  ‎06CC  ARABIC LETTER FARSI YEH
‌  ‎200C  ZERO WIDTH NON-JOINER
د  ‎062F  ARABIC LETTER DAL
ا  ‎0627  ARABIC LETTER ALEF

Customising the list format

What may be less obvious is that you can also customise the format of this list using the settings under the Options tab. For example, using the List format settings, I can produce a list that moves the character column between the number and the name, like this:

  0627  ا  ARABIC LETTER ALEF
  ‎06CC  ی  ARABIC LETTER FARSI YEH
  ‎0634  ش  ARABIC LETTER SHEEN
  ‎06CC  ی  ARABIC LETTER FARSI YEH
  ‎200C  ‌  ZERO WIDTH NON-JOINER
  ‎062F  د  ARABIC LETTER DAL
  ‎0627  ا  ARABIC LETTER ALEF

Or I can remove one or more columns from the list, such as:

  ا  ARABIC LETTER ALEF
  ی  ARABIC LETTER FARSI YEH
  ش  ARABIC LETTER SHEEN
  ی  ARABIC LETTER FARSI YEH
  ‌  ZERO WIDTH NON-JOINER
  د  ARABIC LETTER DAL
  ا  ARABIC LETTER ALEF

With the option Show U+ in lists I can also add or remove the U+ before the codepoint value. For example, this lets me produce the following list:

  ‎U+0627  ARABIC LETTER ALEF
  ‎U+06CC  ARABIC LETTER FARSI YEH
  ‎U+0634  ARABIC LETTER SHEEN
  ‎U+06CC  ARABIC LETTER FARSI YEH
  ‎U+200C  ZERO WIDTH NON-JOINER
  ‎U+062F  ARABIC LETTER DAL
  ‎U+0627  ARABIC LETTER ALEF

Other lists in UniView

We’ve shown how you can make a list of characters in the Cut & Paste box, but don’t forget that you can create lists for a Unicode block, custom range of characters, search list results, or list of codepoint values, etc. And not only that, but you can filter lists in various ways.

Here is just one quick example of how you can obtain a list of numbers for the Devanagari script.

  1. On the Look up tab, select Devanagari from the Unicode block pull down list.
  2. Select Show range as list and deselect (optional) Use graphics.
  3. Under the Filter tab, select Number from the Show properties pull down list.
  4. Click on Make list from highlights

You end up with the following list, that you can paste into your document.

०  ‎0966  DEVANAGARI DIGIT ZERO
१  ‎0967  DEVANAGARI DIGIT ONE
२  ‎0968  DEVANAGARI DIGIT TWO
३  ‎0969  DEVANAGARI DIGIT THREE
४  ‎096A  DEVANAGARI DIGIT FOUR
५  ‎096B  DEVANAGARI DIGIT FIVE
६  ‎096C  DEVANAGARI DIGIT SIX
७  ‎096D  DEVANAGARI DIGIT SEVEN
८  ‎096E  DEVANAGARI DIGIT EIGHT
९  ‎096F  DEVANAGARI DIGIT NINE

(Of course, you can also customise the layout of this list as described in the previous section.)

Try it out.

Reversing the process: from list to string

To complete the circle, you can also cut & paste any of the lists in the blog text above into UniView, to explore each character’s properties or recreate the string.

Select one of the lists above and paste it into the Characters input field on the Look up tab. Hit the downwards pointing arrow icon alongside, and UniView will recreate the list for you. Click on each character to view detailed information about it.

If you want to recreate the string from the list, simply click on the upwards pointing arrow icon below the Copy & paste box, and the list of characters will be reconstituted in the box as a string.

Voila!

Picture of the page in action.

>> Use UniView

About the tool: Look up and see characters (using graphics or fonts) and property information, view whole character blocks or custom ranges, select characters to paste into your document, paste in and discover unknown characters, search for characters, do hex/dec/ncr conversions, highlight character types, etc. etc. Supports Unicode 6.0 and written with Web Standards to work on a variety of browsers. No need to install anything.

Latest changes: The majority of changes in this update relate to the user interface. They include the following:

  • Many controls have been grouped under three tabs: Look up, Filter, and Options. Various previously dispersed controls were gathered together under the Filter and Options tabs. Many of the controls have been slightly renamed.
  • The Search control has been moved to the top right of the window, where it is always visible.
  • The old Text Area is now a Copy & Paste control that has a 2-dimensional input box. In browser such as Safari, Chrome and Firefox 4, this box can be stretched by the user to whatever size is preferred.
  • The icon that provides a toggle switch between revealing detailed information for a character in a list or table, or copying that character to the Copy & Paste box has been redesigned. It stands alone and indicates the location of the current outcome using arrows.
    It looks like this: with the two arrows or this with the two arrows.
  • Title text has been provided for all controls, describing briefly what that control does. You can see this information by hovering over the control with the mouse.

Many of these changes were introduced to make it a little easier for newcomers to get to grips with UniView.

There were also some feature changes:

  • The ‘Codepoints’ control was converted to accept text as well as code points and renamed ‘Characters’. By default the control expect hex code point values, but this can be switched using the radio buttons. For text, you would usually use the ‘Copy & Paste’ control, but if you want to check out some characters without disturbing the contents of that control, you can now do so by setting the ‘Character’ radio button on the ‘Characters’ control.
  • The control to look up characters in the Unihan database the icon that looks like a Japanese character was fixed, but also extended to handle multiple characters at a time, opening a separate window for each character. (UniView warns you if you try to open more than 5 windows.)
  • The control to send characters to the Unicode Conversion tool the icon with overlapping boxes was fixed and now puts the character content of the field in the green box of the Converter Tool. If you need to convert hex or decimal code point values, do that in the converter.
  • The Show Age feature now works with lists, not just tables.

Picture of the page in action.

>> Use UniView lite

>> Use UniView

About the tool: Look up and see characters (using graphics or fonts) and property information, view whole character blocks or custom ranges, select characters to paste into your document, paste in and discover unknown characters, search for characters, do hex/dec/ncr conversions, highlight character types, etc. etc. Supports Unicode 5.2 and written with Web Standards to work on a variety of browsers. No need to install anything.

Latest changes: The major change in this update is the addition of an alternative UniView lite interface for the tool that makes it easier to use UniView in restricted screen sizes, such as on mobile devices. The lite interface offers a subset of the functionality provided in the full version, rearranges the user interface and sets up some different defaults (eg. list view is the default, rather than the matrix view). However, the underlying code is the same – only the initial markup and the CSS are different.

Another significant change is that when you click on a character in a list or matrix that character is either added to the text area or detailed information for that character is displayed, but not now both at the same time. You switch between the two possibilities by clicking on the icon. When the background is white (default) details are shown for the character. When the background is orange the character will be added to the text area (like a character map or picker).

Information from my character database is now shown by default when you are shown detailed information for a character. The switch to disable this has been moved to the Options panel.

Text highlighted in red in information from the character database contains examples. In case you don’t have a font for viewing such examples, or in case you just want to better understand the component characters, you can now click on these and the component characters will be listed in a new window (using the String Analyzer tool).

Access to Settings panel has been moved slightly downwards and renamed Options in the full version.

The default order for items in lists is now <character><codepoint><name>, rather than the previous <codepoint><character><name>. This can still be changed in the Options panel, or by setting query parameters.

I changed the Next and Previous functions in the character detail pane so that it moves one codepoint at a time through the Unicode encoding space. The controls are now buttons rather than images.

Picture of the page in action.

About the tool: Look up and see characters (using graphics or fonts) and property information, view whole character blocks or custom ranges, select characters to paste into your document, paste in and discover unknown characters, search for characters, do hex/dec/ncr conversions, highlight character types, etc. etc. Supports Unicode 5.2 and written with Web Standards to work on a variety of browsers. No need to install anything.

Latest changes: The major change in this update is the addition of a function, Show age, to show the version of Unicode where a character was added (after version 1.1). The same information is also listed in the details given for a character in the lower right panel.

The trigger for context-sensitive help was reduced to the first character of a command name, rather than the whole command name. This improves behaviour for commands under More actions by allowing you to click on the command name rather than just the icon alongside to activate the command.

Some ‘quick start’ instructions were also added to the initial display to orient people new to the tool, and this help text was updated in various areas.

The highlighting mechanism was changed. Rather than highlight characters using a coloured border (which is typically not very visible), highlighting now works by greying out characters that are not highlighted. This also makes it clearer when nothing is highlighted.

In the recent past, when you converted a matrix to a list in the lower left panel, greyed-out rows would be added for non-characters. These are no longer displayed. Consequently, the command to remove such rows from the list (previously under More actions) has been removed.

A lot of invisible work went into replacing style attributes in the code with class names. This produces better source code, but doesn’t affect the user experience.

>> Use it


>> See what it can do !

>> Use it !

Picture of the page in action.

The major changes in this version relate to the way searching and property-based lookup is done on characters in the lower left panel, and features for refining and capturing the resulting lists.

Removed the two Highlight selection boxes. These used to highlight characters in the lower left panel with a specific property value. The Show selection box on the left (used to be Show list) now does that job if you set the Local checkbox alongside it. (Local is the default for this feature.)

As part of that move, the former SiR (search in range) checkbox that used to be alongside Custom range has been moved below the Search for input field, and renamed to Local. If Local is checked, searching can now be done on any content in the lower left panel, and the results are shown as highlighting, rather than a new list.

To complement these new highlighting capabilities, a new feature was added. If you click on the icon next to Make list from highlights the content of the lower left panel will be replaced by a list of just those items that are currently highlighted – whether the highlighting results from a search or a property listing. Note that this can also be useful to refine searches: perform an initial search, convert the result to a list, then perform another search on that list, and so on.

Finally got around to putting  icons after the pull-down lists. This means that if you want to reapply, say, a block selection after doing something else, only one click is needed (rather than having to choose another option, then choose the original option). The effect of this on the ease of use of UniView is much greater than I expected.

Added an icon  to the text area. If you click on this, all the characters in the lower left panel are copied into the text area. This is very useful for capturing the result of a search, or even a whole block. Note that if a list in the lower left panel contains unassigned code points, these are not copied to the text area.

As a result of the above changes, the way Show as graphics and Show range as list work internally was essential rewritten, but users shouldn’t see the difference.

Changed the label Character area to Text area.

>> See what it can do !

>> Use it !

Picture of the page in action.

The main change in this version is the reworking of the former Cut & paste and Code point(s) fields to make it easier to use UniView as a generalised picker.

Moved the cut&paste field downwards, made it larger, and changed the label to character area. This should make it easier to deal with text copy/cut & paste, and more obvious that that is possible with UniView. It is much clearer now that UniView provides character map/picker functionality, and not just character lookup.

Whereas previously you had to double-click to put a character in the lower left pane into the Cut&paste field, UniView now echoes characters to the Character area every time you (single) click on a character in the lower left hand pane. This can be turned off. Double-clicking will still add the codepoint of a character in the lower left panel to the Code points field.

The Character area has its own set of icons, some of which are new: ie. you can select the text, add a space, and change the font of the text in the area (as well as turn the echo on and off). I also spruced up the icons on the UI in general.

Note that on most browsers you can insert characters at the point in the Character area where you set the cursor, or you can overwrite a highlight range of characters, whereas (because of the non-standard way it handles selections and ranges) Internet Explorer will always add characters to the end of the line.

The Code points field has also been enlarged, and I moved the Show list pull-down to the left and Show as graphics and Show page as list to the right. This puts all the main commands for creating lists together on the left.

When you mouse over character in the lower left pane you now see both hex and decimal codepoint information. (Previously you just saw an unlabelled decimal number.) You will also find decimal code point values for characters displayed in the lower right panel.

Fixed a bug in the Code points input feature so that trailing spaces no longer produce errors, but also went much further than that. You can now add random text containing codepoints or most types of hex-based escaped characters to the input field, and UniView will seek them out to create the list. For example, if you paste the following into the Code points field:

the decomposition mapping is <U+CE20, U+11B8>, and not <U+110E, U+1173, U+11B8>.

the result will be:

CE20: 츠 [Hangul Syllables]
11B8: ᆸ HANGUL JONGSEONG PIEUP
110E: ᄎ HANGUL CHOSEONG CHIEUCH
1173: ᅳ HANGUL JUNGSEONG EU
11B8: ᆸ HANGUL JONGSEONG PIEUP

Of course, UniView is not able to tell that an ordinary word like ‘Abba’ is not a hex codepoint, so you obviously need to watch out for that and a few other situations, but much of the time this should make it much easier to extract codepoint information.

I still haven’t found a way to fix the display bug in Safari and Google Chrome that causes initial content in the lower left pane to be only partially displayed.