Dochula Pass, Bhutan

Picture of the page in action.

I’ve been doing more work on the Egyptian Hieroglyph picker over the weekend.

The data behind the keyword search has now been completely updated to reflect descriptions by Gardiner and Allen. If you work with those lists it should now be easy to locate hieroglyphs using keywords. The search mechanism has also been rewritten so that you don’t need to type keywords in a particular order for them to match. I also strip out various common function words and do some other optimisation before attempting a match.

The other headline news is the addition of various controls above the text area, including one that will render MdC text as a two-dimensional arrangement of hieroglyphs. To do this, I adapted WikiHiero’s PHP code to run in javascript. You can see an example of the output in the picture attached to this post. If you want to try it, the MdC text to put in the text area is:
anx-G5-zmA:tA:tA-nbty-zmA:tA:tA-sw:t-bit:t-< -zA-ra:.-mn:n-T:w-Htp:t*p->-anx-D:t:N17-!

The result should look like this:

Picture of hieroglyphs.

Other new controls allow you to convert MdC text to hieroglyphs, and vice versa, or to type in a Unicode phonetic transcription and find the hieroglyphs it represents. (This may still need a little more work.)

I also moved the help text from the notes area to a separate file, with a nice clickable picture of the picker at the top that will link to particular features. You can get to that page by clicking on the blue Help box near the bottom of the picker.

Finally, you can now set the text area to display characters from right to left, in right-aligned lines, using more controls > Output direction. Unfortunately, i don’t know of a font that under these conditions will flip the hieroglyphs horizontally so that they face the right way.

For more information about the new features, and how to use the picker, see the Help page.

Picture of the page in action.

Over the weekend I added a set of new features to the picker for Egyptian Hieroglyphs, aimed at making it easier to locate a particular hieroglyph. Here is a run-down of various methods now available.

Category-based input

This was the original method. Characters are grouped into standard categories. Click on one of the orange characters, chosen as a nominal representative of the class, to show below all the characters in that category. Click on one of those to add it to the output box. As you mouse over the orange characters, you’ll see the name of the category appear just below the output box.

Keyword-search-based input

The app associates most hieroglyphs with keywords that describe the glyph. You can search for glyphs using those keywords in the input field labelled Search for.

Searching for ripple will match both ripple and ripples. Searching for king will match king and walking. If you want to only match whole words, surround the search term with colons, ie. :ripple: or :king:.

Note that the keywords are written in British English, so you need to look for sceptre rather than scepter.

The search input is treated as a regular expression, so if you want to search for two words that may have other words between them, use .*. For example, ox .* palm will match ox horns with stripped palm branch.

Many of the hieroglyphs have also been associated with keywords related to their use. If you select Include usage, these keywords will also be selected. Note that this keyword list is not exhaustive by any means, but it may occasionally be useful. For example, a search for Anubis will produce 𓁢 𓃢 𓃣 𓃤 .

(Note: to search for a character based on the Unicode name for that character, eg. w004, use the search box in the yellow area.)

Searching for pronunciations

Many of the hieroglyphs are associated with 1, 2 or 3 consonant pronunciations. These can be looked up as follows.

Type the sequence of consonants into the output box and highlight them. Then click on Look up from Latin. Hieroglyphs that match that character or sequence of characters will be displayed below the output box, and can be added to the output box by clicking on them. (Note that if you still have the search string highlighted in the output box those characters will be replaced by the hieroglyph.)

You will find the panel Latin characters useful for typing characters that are not accessible via your keyboard. The panel is displayed by clicking on the higher L in the grey bar to the left. Click on a character to add it to the output area.

For example, if you want to obtain the hieroglyph 𓎝, which is represented by the 3-character sequence wꜣḥ, add wꜣḥ to the output area and select it. Then click on Latin characters. You will see the character you need just above the SPACE button. Click on that hieroglyph and it will replace the wꜣḥ text in the output area. (Unhighlight the text in the output area if you want to keep both and add the hierglyph at the cursor position.)

Input panels accessed from the vertical grey bar

The vertical grey bar to the left allows you to turn on/off a number of panels that can help create the text you want.

Latin characters. This panel displays Latin characters you are likely to need for transcription. It is particularly useful for setting up a search by pronunciation (see above).

Latin to Egyptian. This panel also displays Latin characters used for transcription, but when you click on them they insert hieroglyphs into the output area. These are 24 hieroglyphs represented by a single consonant. Think of it as a shortcut if you want to find 1-consonant hieroglyphs by pronunciation.

Where a single consonant can be represented by more than one hieroglyph, a small pop-up will present you with the available choices. Just click on the one you want.

Egyptian alphabet. This panel displays the 26 hieroglyphs that the previous panel produces as hieroglyphs. In many cases this is the quickest way of typing in these hieroglyphs.

Picture of the page in action.

I have just published a picker for Egyptian Hieroglyphs.

This Unicode character picker allows you to produce or analyse runs of Egyptian Hieroglyph text using the Latin script.

Characters are grouped into standard categories. Click on one of the orange characters, chosen as a nominal representative of the class, to show below all the characters in that category. Click on one of those to add it to the output box. As you mouse over the orange characters, you’ll see the name of the category appear just below the output box.

Just above the orange characters you can find buttons to insert RLO and PDF controls. RLO will make the characters that follow it to progress from right to left. Alternatively, you can select more controls > Output direction to set the direction of the output box to RTL/LTR override. The latter approach will align the text to the right of the box. I haven’t yet found a Unicode font that also flips the glyphs horizontally as a result. I’m not entirely sure about the best way to apply directionality to Egyptian hieroglyphs, so I’m happy to hear suggestions.

Alongside the direction controls are some characters used for markup in the Manuel de Codage, which allows you to prepare text for an engine that knows how to lay it out two-dimensionally. (The picker doesn’t do that.)

The Latin Characters panel, opened from the grey bar to the left, provides characters needed for transcription.

In case you’re interested, here is the text you can see in the picture. (You’ll need a font to see this, of course. Try the free Noto Sans font, if you don’t have one – or copy-paste these lines into the picker, where you have a webfont.)
𓀀𓅃𓆣𓁿
<-i-mn:n-R4:t*p->
𓍹𓇋-𓏠:𓈖-𓊵:𓏏*𓊪𓍺

The last two lines spell the name of Amenhotep using Manuel de Codage markup, according to the Unicode Standard (p 432).