Picture of the page in action.
>> Use the picker

Character pickers are especially useful for people who don’t know a script well, as characters are displayed in ways that aid identification. These pickers also provide tools to manipulate the text.

The Runic character picker allows you to produce or analyse runs of Runic text. It allows you to type in runes for the Elder fuþark, Younger fuþark (both long-branch and short-twig variants), the Medieval fuþark and the Anglo-Saxon fuþork. To help beginners, each of the above has its own keyboard-style layout that associates the runes with characters on the keyboard to make it easier to locate them.

It can also produce a latin transliteration for a sequence of runes, or automatically produce runes from a latin transliteration. (Note that these transcriptions do not indicate pronunciation – they are standard latin substitutes for graphemes, rather than actual Old Norse or Old English, etc, text. To convert Old Norse to runes, see the description of the Old Norse pickers below. This will soon be joined by another picker which will do the same for Anglo-Saxon runes.)

Writing in runes is not an exact science. Actual runic text is subject to many variations dependent on chronology, location and the author’s idiosyncracies. It should be particularly noted that the automated transcription tools provided with this picker are intended as aids to speed up transcription, rather than to produce absolutely accurate renderings of specific texts. The output may need to be tweaked to produce the desired results.

You can use the RLO/PDF buttons below the keyboard to make the runic text run right-to-left, eg. ‮ᚹᚪᚱᚦᚷᚪ‬, and if you have the right font (such as Junicode, which is included as the default webfont, or a Babelstone font), make the glyphs face to the left also. The Bablestone fonts also implement a number of bind-runes for Anglo-Saxon (but are missing those for Old Norse) if you put a ZWJ character between the characters you want to ligate. For example: ᚻ‍ᛖ‍ᛚ. You can also produce two glyphs mirrored around the central stave by putting ZWJ between two identical characters, eg. ᚢ‍ᚢ. (Click on the picture of the picker in this blog post to see examples.)

Picture of the page in action.
>> Use the picker

The Old Norse picker allows you to produce or analyse runs of Old Norse text using the Latin script. It is based on a standardised orthography.

In addition to helping you to type Old Norse latin-based text, the picker allows you to automatically generate phonetic and runic transcriptions. These should be used with caution! The phonetic transcriptions are only intended to be a rough guide, and, as mentioned earlier, real-life runic text is often highly idiosyncratic, not to mention that it varies depending on the time period and region.

The runic transcription tools in this app produce runes of the Younger fuþark – used for Old Norse after the Elder and before the Medieval fuþarks. This transcription tool has its own idiosyncracies, that may not always match real-life usage of runes. One particular idiosyncracy is that the output always regularly conforms to the same set of rules, but others include the decision not to remove homorganic nasals before certain following letters. More information about this is given in the notes.

You can see an example of the output from these tools in the picture of the Old Norse picker that is attached to this blog post. Here’s some Old Norse text you can play with: Ok sem leið at jólum, gørðusk menn þar ókátir. Bǫðvarr spurði Hǫtt hverju þat sætti; hann sagði honum at dýr eitt hafi komit þar tvá vetr í samt, mikit ok ógurligt.

The picker also has a couple of tools to help you work with A New Introduction to Old Norse.