I have uploaded a new version of the Thai character picker.

The new version uses characters instead of images for the selection table, making it faster to load and more flexible, and dispenses with the transcription view. If you prefer, you can still access the previous version.

Other changes include:

  • Significant rearrangement of the default selection table. The new arrangement makes it easy to choose the right characters if you have a Latin transcription to hand, which allows the removal of the previous transcription view, at the same time as speeding up that type of picking.
  • Addition of latin prompts to help locate letters (standard with v15).
  • Automatic transcription from Thai into ISO 11940-1, ISO 11940-2 and IPA. Note that for the last two there are some corner cases where the results are not quite correct, due to the ambiguity of the script, and note also that you need to show syllable boundaries with spaces before transcribing. (There’s a way to remove those spaces quickly afterwards.) See below for more information.
  • Hints! When switched on and you mouse over a character, other similar characters or characters incorporating the shape you moused over, are highlighted. Particularly useful for people who don’t know the script well, and may miss small differences, but also useful sometimes for finding a character if you first see something similar.
  • It also comes with the new v15 features that are standard, such as shape-based picking without losing context, range-selectable codepoint information, a rehabilitated escapes button, the ability to change the font of the table and the line-height of the output, and the ability to turn off autofocus on mobile devices to stop the keyboard jumping up all the time, etc.

For more information about the picker, see the notes at the bottom of the picker page.

About pickers: Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. Pickers are likely to be most useful if you don’t know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more usable than a regular character map utility. See the list of available pickers.

More about the transcriptions: There are three buttons that allow you to convert from Thai text to Latin transcriptions. If you highlight part of the text, only that part will be transcribed.

The toISO-1 button produces an ISO 11940-1 transliteration, that latinises the Thai characters without changing their order. The result doesn’t normally tell you how to pronounce the Thai text, but it can be converted back to Thai as each Thai character is represented by a unique sequence in Latin. This transcription should produce fully conformant output. There is no need to identify syllables boundaries first.

The toISO-2 and toIPA buttons produce an output that is intended to approximately reflect actual pronunciation. It will work fine most of the time, but there are occasional ambiguities and idiosynchrasies in Thai which will cause the converter to render certain, less common syllables incorrectly. It also doesn’t automatically add accent marks to the phonetic version (though that may be added later). So the output of these buttons should be treated as something that gets you 90% of the way. NOTE: Before using these two buttons you need to add spaces or hyphens between each syllable of the Thai text. Syllable boundaries are important for correct interpretation of the text, and they are not detected automatically.

The condense button removes the spaces from the highlighted range (or the whole output area, if nothing is highlighted).

Note: For the toISO-2 transcription I use a macron over long vowels. This is non-standard.