I have uploaded a new version of the Tibetan character picker.

The new version dispenses with the images for the selection table. If you don’t have a suitable font to display the new version of the picker, you can still access the previous version, which uses images.

Other changes include:

  • Significant rearrangement of the default table, with many less common symbols moved into a location that you need to click on to reveal. This declutters the selection table.
  • Addition of latin prompts to help locate letters (standard with v15).
  • Hints (When switched on and you mouse over a character, other similar characters or characters incorporating the shape you moused over, are highlighted. Particularly useful for people who don’t know the script well, and may miss small differences, but also useful sometimes for finding a character if you first see something similar.)
  • A new Wylie button that converts Tibetan text into an extended Wylie Latin transcription. There are still some uncommon characters that don’t work, but it should cover most normal needs. I used diacritics over lowercase letters rather than uppercase letters, except for the fixed form characters. I also didn’t provide conversions for many of the symbols – they will appear without change in the transcription. See the notes on the page for more information.
  • The Codepoints button, which produces a list of characters in the output box, now has a new feature. If you have highlighted some text in the output box, you will only see a list of the highlighted characters. If there are no highlights, the contents of the whole output box are listed.
  • Don’t forget, if you are using the picker on an iPad or mobile device, to set Autofocus to Off before tapping on characters. This stops the device keypad popping up every time you select a character. (This is also standard for v15.)

About pickers: Pickers allow you to quickly create phrases in a script by clicking on Unicode characters arranged in a way that aids their identification. Pickers are likely to be most useful if you don’t know a script well enough to use the native keyboard. The arrangement of characters also makes it much more usable than a regular character map utility. See the list of available pickers.