Screen shot 2014-09-26 at 16.36.47

The W3C needs to make sure that the typographic needs of scripts and languages around the world are built in to technologies such as HTML, CSS, SVG, etc. so that Web pages and eBooks can look and behave as expected for people around the world.

To that end we have experts in various parts of the world documenting typographic requirements and gaps between what is needed and what is currently supported in browsers and ebook readers.

The flagship document is Requirements for Japanese Text Layout. The information in this document has been widely used, and the process used for creating it was extremely effective. It was developed in Japan, by a task force using mailing lists and holding meetings in japanese, then converted to english for review. It was published in both languages.

We now have groups working on Indic Layout Requirements and Requirements for Hangul Text Layout and Typography, and this month I was in Beijing to discuss ongoing work on Chinese layout requirements (URL coming soon), and we heard from experts in Mongolian, Tibetan, and Uyghur who are keen to also participate in the Chinese task force and produce similar documents for their part of the world.

The Internationalization (i18n) Working Group at the W3C has also been working on other aspects of the mutlilingual user experience. For example, improvements for bidirectional text support (Arabic, Hebrew, Thaana, etc) for HTML and CSS, and supporting the work on counter styles at CSS.

To support local relevance of Web pages and eBook formats we need local experts to participate in gathering information in these task forces, to review the task force outputs, and to lobby or support via coding the implementation of features in browsers and ereaders. If you are one of these people, or know some, please get in touch!

We particularly need more information about how to handle typographic features of the Arabic script.

In the hope that it will help, I have put together some information on current areas of activity at the W3C, with pointers to useful existing requirements, specifications and tests. It is not exhaustive, and I expect it to be added to and improved over time.

Look through the list and check whether your needs are being adequately covered. If not, write to www-international@w3.org (you need to subscribe first) and make the case. If the spec does cover your needs, but the browsers don’t support your needs, raise bugs against the browsers.