Dochula Pass, Bhutan

Picture of the page in action.

>> Use UniView

This version updates the app per the changes during beta phase of the specification, so that it now reflects the finalised Unicode 7.0.0.

The initial in-app help information displayed for new users was significantly updated, and the help tab now links directly to the help page.

A more significant improvement was the addition of links to character descriptions (on the right) where such details exist. This finally reintegrates the information that was previously pulled in from a database. Links are only provided where additional data actually exists. To see an example, go here and click on See character notes at the bottom right.

Rather than pull the data into the page, the link opens a new window containing the appropriate information. This has advantages for comparing data, but it was also the best solution I could find without using PHP (which is no longer available on the server I use). It also makes it easier to edit the character notes, so the amount of such detail should grow faster. In fact, some additional pages of notes were added along with this upgrade.

A pop-up window containing resource information used to appear when you used the query to show a block. This no longer happens.

Changes in version 7beta

I forgot to announce this version on my blog, so for good measure, here are the (pretty big) changes it introduced.

This version adds the 2,834 new characters encoded in the Unicode 7.0.0 beta, including characters for 23 new scripts. It also simplified the user interface, and eliminated most of the bugs introduced in the quick port to JavaScript that was the previous version.

Some features that were available in version 6.1.0a are still not available, but they are minor.

Significant changes to the UI include the removal of the ‘popout’ box, and the merging of the search input box with that of the other features listed under Find.

In addition, the buttons that used to appear when you select a Unicode block have changed. Now the block name appears near the top right of the page with a I icon icon. Clicking on the icon takes you to a page listing resources for that block, rather than listing the resources in the lower right part of UniView’s interface.

UniView no longer uses a database to display additional notes about characters. Instead, the information is being added to HTML files.

>> Use it

This HTML page allows you to expand information in the lines of the UnicodeData.txt file, edit them and generate a new version. It also checks the data for validity in a number of areas.

It can be helpful if you have the misfortune to pore over the source code of the UnicodeData.txt file and find your eyes blurring as you count fields. And it is particularly useful for people submitting proposals for new scripts or characters to the Unicode Consortium, to help them generate correct lists of unicode properties for inclusion in the proposal. (You can even build the whole thing in the UI, error free, by starting with a number of blank lines, such as 1111;NAME;;;;;;;;;;;;;.)

The image below shows the page in action. I dropped in a couple of lines from the Ahom script proposal, and vandalised them slightly. The first panel shows that the app has spotted an error. I used the column to the right to edit out the error in the second panel, and regenerated the lines in the box below.

Picture of the page in action.

Having made edits you can copy paste the output back into the top box to send it through the sausage machine again, and check that there are no remaining errors.

You can add a whole script block at a time to the top box, or a single line – as you like.

Well, it’s a bit esoteric, but hopefully it will be useful to someone somewhere.

Picture of the page in action.

I’ve wanted to get around to this for years now. Here is a list of fonts that come with Windows7 and Mac OS X Snow Leopard/Lion, grouped by script.

This kind of list could be used to set font-family styles for CSS, if you want to be reasonably sure what the user will see, or it could be used just to find a font you like for a particular script. I’m still working on the list, and there are some caveats.

>> See the list

Some of the fonts listed above may be disabled on the user’s system. I’m making an assumption that someone who reads tibetan will have the Tibetan font turned on, but for my articles that explain writing systems to people in English, such assumptions may not hold.

The list I used to identify Windows fonts is Windows7-specific and fairly stable, but the Mac font spans more than one version of Mac OS X, and I could only find an unofficial list of fonts for Snow Leopard, and there were some fonts on that list that I didn’t have on my system. Where a Mac font is new with Lion (and there are a significant number) it is indicated. See the official list of fonts on Mac OS X Lion.

There shouldn’t be any fonts listed here for a given script that aren’t supplied with Windows7 or Mac OS X Snow Leopard/Lion, but there are probably supplied fonts that are not yet listed here (typically these will be large fonts that cover multiple scripts). In particular, note that I haven’t yet made a list of fonts that support Latin, Greek and Cyrillic (mainly because there are so many of them and partly because I’m wondering how useful it will be.)

The text used is as much as would fit on one line of article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, taken from this Unicode page, wherever I could find it. I created a few instances myself, where it was missing, and occasionally I resorted to arbitrary lists of characters.

You can obtain a character-based version of the text used by looking at the source text: look for the title attribute on the section heading.

Things still to do:

  • create sections for Latin, Greek and Cyrillic fonts
  • check for fonts covering multiple Unicode blocks
  • figure out how to tell, and how to show which is the system default
  • work out and show what’s not available in Windows XP
  • work out what’s new in Lion, and whether it’s worth including them
  • figure out whether people with different locale setups see different things
  • recapture all font images that need it at 36px, rather than varying sizes

Update, 19 Feb 2012

I uploaded a new version of the font list with the following main changes:

  • If you click on an image you see text with that font applied (if you have it on your system, of course). The text can be zoomed from 14px to 100px (using a nice HTML5 slider, if you have the right browser! [try Chrome, Safari or Opera]). This text includes a little Latin text so you can see the relationship between that and the script.
  • All font graphics are now standardised so that text is imaged at a font size of 36px. This makes it more difficult to see some fonts (unless you can use the zoom text feature), but gives a better idea of how fonts vary in default size.
  • I added a few extra fonts which contained multiple script support.
  • I split Chinese into Simplified and Traditional sections.
  • Various other improvements, such as adding real text for N’Ko, correcting the Traditional Chinese text, flipping headers to the left for RTL fonts, reordering fonts so that similar ones are near to each other, etc.

Webfonts, and WOFF in particular, have been in the news again recently, so I thought I should mention that a few days ago I changed my pages describing Myanmar and Arabic-for-Urdu scripts so that you can download the necessary font support for the foreign text, either as a TTF linked font or as WOFF font.

You can find the Myanmar page at http://rishida.net/scripts/myanmar/. Look for the links n the side bar to the right, under the heading “Fonts”.

The Urdu page, using the beautiful Nastaliq script, is at http://rishida.net/scripts/urdu/.

(Note that the examples of short vowels don’t use the nastiliq style. Scroll down the page a little further.)

I haven’t had time to check whether all the opentype features are correctly rendered, but I’ve been doing Mac testing of the i18n webfonts tests, and it looks promising. (More on that later.) The Urdu font doesn’t rely on OS rendering, which should help.

Here are some examples of the text on the page:
Examples of Urdu script and Myanmar script.

http://rishida.net/scripts/indic-overview/

I finally got around to refreshing this article, by converting the Bengali, Malayalam and Oriya examples to Unicode text. Back when I first wrote the article, it was hard to find fonts for those scripts.

I also added a new feature: In the HTML version, click on any of the examples in indic text and a pop-up appears at the bottom right of the page, showing which characters the example is composed of. The pop-up lists the characters in order, with Unicode names, and shows the characters themselves as graphics.

I have not yet updated this article’s incarnation as Unicode Technical Note #10. The Indian Government also used this article, and made a number of small changes. I have yet to incorporate those, too.

Characters in the Unicode Bengali block.

If you’re interested, I just did a major overhaul of my script notes on Bengali in Unicode. There’s a new section about which characters to use when there are multiple options (eg. RRA vs. DDA+nukta), and the page provides information about more characters from the Bengali block in Unicode (including those used in Bengali’s amazingly complicated currency notation prior to 1957).

In addition, this has all been squeezed into the latest look and feel for script notes pages.

The new page is at a new location. There is a redirect on the old page.

Hope it’s useful.

>> Read it


>> Read it !

Picture of the page in action.

I finally got to the point, after many long early morning hours, where I felt I could remove the ‘Draft’ from the heading of my Myanmar (Burmese) script notes.

This page is the result of my explorations into how the Myanmar script is used for the Burmese language in the context of the Unicode Myanmar block. It takes into account the significant changes introduced in Unicode version 5.1 in April of this year.

Btw, if you have JavaScript running you can get a list of characters in the examples by mousing over them. If you don’t have JS, you can link to the same information.

There’s also a PDF version, if you don’t want to install the (free) fonts pointed to for the examples.

Here is a summary of the script:

Myanmar is a tonal language and is syllable-based. The script is an abugida, ie. consonants carry an inherent vowel sound that is overridden using vowel signs.

Spaces are used to separate phrases, rather than words. Words can be separated with ZWSP to allow for easy wrapping of text.

Words are composed of syllables. These start with an consonant or initial vowel. An initial consonant may be followed by a medial consonant, which adds the sound j or w. After the vowel, a syllable may end with a nasalisation of the vowel or an unreleased glottal stop, though these final sounds can be represented by various different consonant symbols.

At the end of a syllable a final consonant usually has an ‘asat’ sign above it, to show that there is no inherent vowel.

In multisyllabic words derived from an Indian language such as Pali, where two consonants occur internally with no intervening vowel, the consonants tend to be stacked vertically, and the asat sign is not used.

Text runs from left to right.

There are a set of Myanmar numerals, which are used just like Latin digits.

So, what next. I’m quite keen to get to Mongolian. That looks really complicated. But I’ve been telling myself for a while that I ought to look at Malayalam or Tamil, so I think I’ll try Malayalam.

[new version]

In preparation for my full-day tutorial at WWW2005 I’ve been creating and renovating presentations. As a result, the format of this tutorial has been reworked to fit the style I have recently developed for tutorials on the W3C Internationalization site.

The text remains the same, but you can now view slides as a single document (good for printing), or as individual slides with XHTML-based notes. The slides themselves are graphics, so you can see what I’m trying to show you, but there’s also a text only version of each slide. There’s also a new overview, to help you jump around easily.

I had wanted to also provide SVG slides, but the SVG export utility in the new version of Open Office (2.0 beta) takes control of positioning the text in a way that doesn’t support combining characters and shaping etc properly. Since my talk is about features that need to be supported for support of complex scripts, this actually provides an interesting object lesson! 🙁 Maybe when I have more time I’ll upload them.

New article

In-progress draft of notes that list the symbols used to represent Bengali, describe their use, and relate them to appropriate characters for representation in Unicode. There is an index of shapes you can use to look up Bengali glyphs and track them down to their constituent Unicode codepoints.